Geofiction In Pop Culture

Anyone who is interested in geofiction has probably looked to pop culture at some point for inspiration. Movies, books, television shows, comics, and other forms of entertainment have incorporated geofiction for as long as they have been around, to the point where even people who have no idea what geofiction is would readily recognize it from the world around them.

Below are some notable examples of geofiction in pop culture, from obvious, well-known works to lesser-known books, movies, shows, etc. Hopefully this list will give you some inspiration and motivation for your own project.

Books

- The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion (J.R.R. Tolkien)
I mention this book a lot when talking about geofiction because to me it is the quintessential example of a geofiction project.

- The Dark Tower Series (Stephen King)
King's seven-volume magnus opus takes familiar concepts and archetypes from fiction and the real world and combines them into a memorable and fascinating created world that forms the setting for an engaging and epic storyline.

- The Caves of Steel (Isaac Asimov)
As far as science fiction-based geofiction is concerned, Asimov is the king. Most of his works involve geofiction of some kind, including this work - a hybrid sci-fi/mystery novel set thousands of years into the future.

Movies and Television

- Star Wars (George Lucas)
Arguably the most famous work of geofiction in cinema, the Star Wars franchise, created by George Lucas, is a pure geofiction project that features planets, races, languages, and technology created from thin air. The images of this franchise have made a lasting mark on pop culture and geofictioners all across the world.

- Stardust
This 2007 movie, adapted from the novel of the same name written by Neil Gaiman, features a fantasy world combining popular concepts of magic, adventure, and romance in a fictional universe that co-exists with the universe as we know it. In this way, it is very similar to Alice in Wonderland. The created world, the kingdom of Stormhold, is accessible via a wall bordering the town of Wall, England, in the real world.

- Heroes
This show, now in its third season on NBC, tells the story of regular people who have mysterious abilities in a modern-day setting. This is an example of geofiction that incorporates elements of science fiction or fantasy in a real-life environment.

Comic Books

Virtually every comic book series out there involves geofiction in some way, but here are two of the best examples of geofiction in the genre:

- Green Lantern (DC Comics)
This series features superheroes called Green Lanterns, who are protectors of the universe who work under the Guardians of the Universe. In this series, many alien races, distant galaxies, foreign planets, and mystical beings appear, comprising one of the most geofiction-centric comic book series in circulation.

- The Multiverse (Marvel Comics)
The Multiverse is a concept employed by Marvel Comics which features many different universes in addition to the real-world universe. Even though most of the comics in the Marvel line are set in a realistic Earth, many story arcs and character storylines take place in created worlds. Even Earth itself is modified and changed from its real-life state. DC Comics has a similar concept, but the concept in general is more extensively used within the Marvel universe.

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