Diy Bathtub Plumbing

DIY bathtub plumbing relates to the installation of any type of bath or bathtub. So if your plumbing project includes DIY bathtub plumbing, you are going to have to plumb in the tub correctly. There are many different types and sizes of bathtub, but all DIY bathtub plumbing follows the same basic procedures.

Apart from size and the different types of materials used to manufacture bathtubs, there are two distinct differences to be aware of. Some baths, in particular traditional Victorian-style baths that have their own feet, are freestanding. The rest are made to be built-in, usually with brickwork, above the surface of the floor. In both instances you must be absolutely sure to position the tub so that it is perfectly level. Use a spirit level to check all your levels, including pipes, that must be laid correctly, depending where they are. For example, pipes leading to taps are laid so that they are vertical, while overflow pipes usually slope at a slight angle away from the bath.

The different Steps for DIY Bathtub Plumbing

If you are building in a bathtub, you will start by marking the position of all your pipework, for both hot and cold water and for the waste pipe, which must run into a gully to an outside drain. It usually makes sense to position the bath outlet close to an outside wall, although you may be able to run the pipework through the floor, especially if the floor is wooden.

The next step is to build the brickwork that will support the bath. The bath must be well supported, and most plumbers bed baths acrylic baths in a weak cement:sand (or mortar) mix. This stops it from shifting when people climb in and out of the bath.

When it comes to pipework, the process you follow will depend largely on the structure of your house. If the house has brick walls, you will need to chase the pipework into the walls and then plaster over them, so that you don't see them. It is a lot easier with timber frame houses that have dry walls , as the pipes are simply positioned within the framework, inside the wall.

Some baths have holes at one end for taps. Others have just one hole that is intended for a mixer unit. Some baths don't have any holes at all, in which case you will probably mount the taps or mixer to the wall. So that's the inlet water taken care of. But what about the waste water? All bathtubs have plug holes which is how we drain the water after bathing. You will need to fit the trap to the waste outlet of the bath and also an overflow pipe to the overflow - a hole centred below the most usual position of the taps at the end of the bath. A chain that is attached to the plug is usually fixed to the cover (or overflow grate) that fits on the inside of the overflow.

If you are changing the position of a bathtub, the procedure is exactly the same, although you will of course have to move the position of pipes and possibly drains. But the project will still fall within the realms of DIY bathtub plumbing.

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